Wednesday, February 2, 2011

SYSVOL

   In Microsoft Windows, the System Volume (Sysvol) is a shared directory that stores the server copy of the domain's public files that must be shared for common access and replication throughout a domain. The term SYSVOL refers to a set of files and folders that reside on the local hard disk of each domain controller in a domain and that are replicated by the File Replication service (FRS). Network clients access the contents of the SYSVOL tree by using the NETLOGON and SYSVOL shared folders. Sysvol uses junction points-a physical location on a hard disk that points to data that is located elsewhere on your disk or other storage device-to manage a single instance store.

   The System Volume (Sysvol) is a shared directory that stores the server copy of the domain's public files that must be shared for common access and replication throughout a domain. The Sysvol folder on a domain controller contains the following items:
  • Net Logon shares. These typically host logon scripts and policy objects for network client computers.
  • User logon scripts for domains where the administrator uses Active Directory Users and Computers.
  • Windows Group Policy.
  • File replication service (FRS) staging folder and files that must be available and synchronized between domain controllers.
  • File system junctions.

   File system junctions are used extensively in the Sysvol structure and are a feature of NTFS file system 3.0. You must be aware of the existence of junction points and how they operate so that you can avoid data loss or corruption that may occur if you modify the Sysvol structure. Microsoft recommends that you do not modify any files directly to Sysvol without understanding the behavior of junction points and how these points affect Active Directory in your enterprise.

Note: Under Windows Server 2003, if you copy %systemroot%\SYSVOL, you do not copy the junction points. However, under Windows 2000, if you copy %systemroot%\SYSVOL, you do copy the junction points.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324175

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